The reason the Moon warmed up? Blame the astronauts

Scientists have finally figured out the reason behind a small but noticeable uptick in the temperature of the moon’s subsurface while it was under study by astronauts of the Apollo missions in the 1970s. The culprit? Blame those very same astronauts. The … Discuss …read more

In a Flash

As storm clouds develop, the temperature at the top of the clouds becomes much cooler than that at the bottom. For reasons that scientists still do not understand, this temperature difference results in the accumulation of negatively charged particles near the base and positively charged particles near the top of the storm cloud. This buildup […]

Senescence

Biologically speaking, senescence is the process of deterioration that follows the development of an organism. In 1965, Leonard Hayflick discovered that normal diploid cells divide in cell culture about 50 times before entering a senescence phase during which they can replicate no more. Each cell division shortens the telomere of the cell’s DNA, thus ticking […]

Bezoar – It’s a Medical Term

A bezoar is a mass found trapped in the gastrointestinal system, though it can occur in other locations. A pseudobezoar is an indigestible object introduced intentionally into the digestive system. There are several varieties of bezoar, some of which have inorganic constituents and others organic. The term has both a modern (medical, scientific) and a […]

Mungo Man

The Mungo Man was an early human inhabitant of Australia discovered at Lake Mungo in New South Wales, Australia, in 1974, when shifting sand dunes exposed his remains. Although his exact age is a matter of debate, he is believed by many to have lived approximately 40,000 years ago, during the Pleistocene epoch—making his remains […]

Space-Time

In physics, space-time is a four-dimensional continuum consisting of three dimensions in space and one dimension in time. This mathematical model, which is an integral part of Einstein’s relativity theory, combines space and time into a single continuum that allows physicists to more uniformly describe the workings of the universe. The merger of space and […]

lentigo

Definition: (noun) A small, flat, pigmented spot on the skin. Synonyms: freckle. Usage: The dermatologist advised the patient to keep an eye on the large lentigo near her lip and to alert him if there was a change in its size or shape. Discuss …read more

Polymers

Both DNA and plastic, two seemingly unrelated materials, are classified as polymers, compounds of usually high molecular weight consisting of a number of structural units linked together by covalent bonds. A diverse assortment of natural and synthetic materials comprises the class of polymers, including hair, polyester, and shellac. Polymers are even used in the production […]

parhelion

Definition: (noun) A bright spot sometimes appearing on either side of the sun, often on a luminous ring or halo. Synonyms: sundog, mock sun. Usage: At first, Sue thought the bright spot in the sky beside the sun was a comet, but she soon realized that the phenomenon was actually a parhelion. …read more

retrograde

Definition: (adjective) Tending towards an earlier worse condition; declining or deteriorating. Synonyms: deteriorating, backward, regressive, retrogressive. Usage: It would be a retrograde step to revert to the old system. …read more

Olbers’s Paradox

If the universe is assumed to contain an infinite number of uniformly distributed luminous stars, then every point in the sky should be as bright as a star. So why is the sky dark at night? That is the question posed by Olbers’s paradox, named for astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers, who described it in 1823, […]

Halcyon Days

The ancient Greeks called the seven days preceding and the seven days following the Winter Solstice the “Halcyon Days.” Greek mythology has it that Halcyone (or Alcyone), Ceyx’s wife and one of Aeolus’s daughters, drowned herself when she learned her husband had drowned. The gods took pity on her and transformed them both into kingfishers. […]

chrysalism

chrysalism n. the amniotic tranquility of being indoors during a thunderstorm… http://www.dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com/post/21547053916/chrysalism

Halcyon Days

The ancient Greeks called the seven days preceding and the seven days following the Winter Solstice the “Halcyon Days.” Greek mythology has it that Halcyone (or Alcyone), Ceyx’s wife and one of Aeolus’s daughters, drowned herself when she learned her husband had drowned. The gods took pity on her and transformed them both into kingfishers. […]

anemometer

anemometer Definition: (noun) An instrument for measuring wind force and velocity. Synonyms: wind gauge. Usage: The storm chasers loaded their van with high-tech gear, including a number of powerful anemometers. Discuss …read more

Project Excelsior

As jets began flying higher and faster, the US Air Force became increasingly worried about the safety of its flight crew. Project Excelsior was initiated in 1958 to design a multi-stage parachute system that would allow a safe, controlled descent after a high-altitude ejection. In 1959 and 1960, Captain Joseph Kittinger made a series of […]

“where is everyone????”

“where is everyone????” – Fermi’s question The age of the universe and its vast number of stars has led some to suggest that unless the rare Earth hypothesis holds true, extraterrestrial life should be common. In an informal discussion in 1950, the physicist Enrico Fermi questioned why, if a multitude of advanced extraterrestrial civilizations exist in the Milky Way galaxy, evidence […]

Does that robin in your yard mean spring is in the air?

Not always – but most of us will smile at the sight anyway. A favorite of young and old alike for its vivid color and cheery song, the American robin is the state bird of Connecticut, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Cornell Lab of Ornithology We think of American Robins as harbingers of spring, so when we […]

“Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing.”

“Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing.” – Werner Von Braun

What Lights the Firefly

Commonly called fireflies or lightning bugs, the carnivorous beetles of the family Lampyridae are named for their use of bioluminescence when attracting mates or prey. Fireflies are capable of producing red, yellow, or green “cold light” containing no ultraviolet or infrared rays. Approximately 90% of the energy used in the process is converted to visible […]

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